Infectious Diseases

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Projects Title Research Node (Project Site) Department Project Description Number of Places Available (Masters) Number of Places Available (Honours) Primary Supervisor UoM Staff ID Number Primary Supervisor Title Primary Supervisor First Name Primary Supervisor Surname Primary Supervisor Email Co-Supervisor 1 Title Co-Supervisor 1 First Name Co-Supervisor 1 Surname Co-Supervisor 2 Title Co-Supervisor 2 First Name Co-Supervisor 2 Surname Co-Supervisor 3 Title Co-Supervisor 3 First Name Co-Supervisor 3 Surname Additional Supervisors (Please include the title and full name) Opportunity
Defining the essential functions of red blood cell modifying proteins in malaria parasites Burnet Institute Infectious Diseases Infection with malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites afflicts hundreds of millions of people per year, tragically resulting in nearly half a million deaths. The development of new drugs and vaccines can be informed by greater knowledge of the parasite’s biology. This project seeks to understand how parasites extensively modify the red blood cells (RBC) they infect by studying the multitude of proteins the parasite exports into the RBC compartment. In particular, several exported proteins predicted to be essential for parasite survival will be studied to determine what functions they perform and how this contributes to parasite proliferation and immune evasion. 1 A/Prof Paul Gilson paul.gilson@burnet.edu.au Dr Hayley Bullen n/a Honours students
Development of malaria transmission blocking drugs. Royal Melbourne Hospital Infectious Diseases Our laboratory investigates the cellular mechanisms underpinning malaria parasite transmission and disease. We investigate the novel banana shaped sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum, focused on understanding their unique biology and how this contributes to transmission. We are interested in developing and testing drugs and vaccines that may block transmission of the parasite from infected humans to Anopheles mosquitos. 1 1 Dr Matthew Dixon matthew.dixon@unimelb.edu.au Prof James McCarthy n/a PhD students; Masters by Research; Honours students
Malaria: Going bananas for sex Royal Melbourne Hospital Infectious Diseases Our laboratory investigates the cellular mechanisms underpinning malaria parasite transmission and disease. We investigate the novel banana shaped sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum, focused on understanding their unique biology and how this contributes to transmission. We are interested in developing and testing drugs and vaccines that may block transmission of the parasite from infected humans to Anopheles mosquitos. 1 1 Dr Matthew Dixon matthew.dixon@unimelb.edu.au Prof James McCarthy n/a PhD students; Masters by Research; Honours students
The Renovators Dream: Malaria host cell remodelling Royal Melbourne Hospital Infectious Diseases Our laboratory investigates the cellular mechanisms underpinning malaria parasite transmission and disease. We investigate the novel banana shaped sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum, focused on understanding their unique biology and how this contributes to transmission. We are interested in developing and testing drugs and vaccines that may block transmission of the parasite from infected humans to Anopheles mosquitos. 1 1 Dr Matthew Dixon matthew.dixon@unimelb.edu.au Prof James McCarthy n/a PhD students; Masters by Research; Honours students