Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

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Projects Title Research Node (Project Site) Department Project Description Number of Places Available (Masters) Number of Places Available (Honours) Primary Supervisor UoM Staff ID Number Primary Supervisor Title Primary Supervisor First Name Primary Supervisor Surname Primary Supervisor Email Co-Supervisor 1 Title Co-Supervisor 1 First Name Co-Supervisor 1 Surname Co-Supervisor 2 Title Co-Supervisor 2 First Name Co-Supervisor 2 Surname Co-Supervisor 3 Title Co-Supervisor 3 First Name Co-Supervisor 3 Surname Additional Supervisors (Please include the title and full name) Opportunity
A novel link between metabolism and host defence: O-GlcNAc glycosylation Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology In this project we will characterise the function of OGlcNAc glycosylation in immune cells by identifying changes in patterns of glycosylation in different metabolic states and upon encounter of pathogens. 2 Professor Jose Villadangos j.villadangos@unimelb.edu.au Dr Justine Mintern n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Analysing protein structures Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology By analysing the movements of proteins that undergo large conformational change upon association (> 2 Å RMSD), we aim to identify those structural features that provide the information to guide this motion and binding. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Characterisation of the changes of the endocytic and secretory pathway of dendritic cells upon activation Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The aim of this project is to characterize the conformational changes of the endocytic and secretory pathways taking place during dendritic cells activation, using a combination of advance imaging approaches, such as fluorescence microscopy, correlative light and electron microscopy, as well as high resolution Serial Blockface Scanning Electron Microscopy. 1 Associate Professor Isabelle Rouiller isabelle.rouiller@unimelb.edu.au n/a Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Decoding the trafficking of immune receptors Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project will investigate the role of ubiquitin in the tagging and trafficking of immunoreceptors. Specifically, it will investigate the MARCH family. Dr Justine Mintern jmintern@unimelb.edu.au Professor Jose Villadangos n/a PhD; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Designing better drugs Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology We are exploring the chemical signatures of molecules that could be used to treat different cancers and microbial pathogens (including TB, malaria and the most dangerous hospital-acquired, antibiotic-resistant infections. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Designing new optogenetic tools for biomedical research Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology In this project, we seek to develop a new way to control the activity of streptavidin using light.  1 A/Prof Danny Hatters dhatters@unimelb.edu.au Dr Craig Morton n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Development of Novel antimalarial drugs Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology In this Project, we will study these two pathways in Plasmodium to elucidate their roles, determine how their activities intersect and study the action of test inhibitors. This work will provide the basis for the development of new drugs. Professor Leann Tilley ltilley@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Exploiting nanoparticles as vaccines Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology We will investigate how different nanoparticle formulations can be used to elicit immunity to infection and tumours. Dr Justine Mintern jmintern@unimelb.edu.au Professor Jose Villadangos n/a PhD; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Finding clarity within a blizzard- guiding the solution of cryo-EM structures Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project will use structural bioinformatics and machine learning to develop novel computational tools to aid cryo-EM and low resolution crystal structure solving, analysing protein residue environments, protein interaction interfaces, and protein functional sites. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Immunoregulatory functions of the MARCH family of ubiquitin ligases Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project will employ biochemical techniques, microscopy, proteomics, and CRISPR-Cas9 technology to characterise the function of the MARCH family. 2 Professor Jose Villadangos j.villadangos@unimelb.edu.au Dr Justine Mintern n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Improving the diagnostic outcomes of patients with mitochondrial disease Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project employs extensive quantitative proteomics tools, as well as mammalian cell culture of patient and gene-edited hESC cells, analysis of human tissue samples, bioinformatics and computational biology, and metabolic and enzymatic measurments. 1 Dr David Stroud david.stroud@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Investigating mechanisms of protein trafficking to human mitochondria Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project will encompass a variety of cell and molecular biology techniques, including cell culture, confocal microscopy, Blue-native PAGE electrophoresis, protein chemistry and proteomics. Dr Diana Stojanovski d.stojanovski@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Malaria parasite-infected red blood cells: a renovator’s dream Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project will study host cell remodeling and key virulence determinants in P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. knowlesi both in mature erythrocytes and reticulocytes. Professor Leann Tilley ltilley@unimelb.edu.au Dr Adam Blanch n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Manipulating immunity to fight infection and tumours Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vaccination currently represents the most effective strategy for eliminating infectious disease. Dr Justine Mintern jmintern@unimelb.edu.au Professor Jose Villadangos n/a PhD; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Mapping the proteome vulnerable to unfolding and aggregation under proteostasis stress Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project will use state of the art quantitative proteomics and neuron cell culture models.  The project will also employ CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technologies. 1 A/Prof Danny Hatters dhatters@unimelb.edu.au Prof Gavin Reid n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Personalising treatments for genetic diseases Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Our aim is to be able to, for each mutation/modification and for each gene/protein, scalably and effectively assess the overall consequences of the molecular effects and their potential phenotypic outcomes. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Protein trafficking and cellular architecture Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Electron tomography of the malaria parasite The malaria parasite spends part of its life-cycle inside the erythrocytes of its human host. Professor Leann Tilley ltilley@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Rational Protein Engineering Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The ability to identify the effects of mutations is allowing us to optimise proteins for therapeutic and biotechnological purposes. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Sex in human malaria parasites Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology In this project we will use CRISPR gene editing to create transgenic malaria parasites, which we will study by combing proteomics, molecular and cellular biology techniques with super resolution microscopy to define the molecular players driving gametocyte development. 2 Dr Matthew Dixon matthew.dixon@unimelb.edu.au Professor Leann Tilley n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Small molecules for BIG targets- Targeting protein-protein interactions with fragments Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Targeting protein-protein interactions with fragments Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Solving the native structure of the malaria parasite using cryo-electron microscopy Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The proposed project will use cryoEM and molecular biology techniques to study the malaria proteasome to underpin efforts to find potent and specific inhibitors of the proteasome. The project will also solve the structure of mutant and wildtype Pf20S proteasome to understand the molecular basis of resistance. Professor Leann Tilley ltilley@unimelb.edu.au A/Prof. Eric Hanssen n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Structural Biology of Cancer Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The work undertaken by the Parker lab has provided major contributions to identification of targets for cancer therapy, and understanding the mechanisms of cancer growth and spread. Professor Michael Parker mwp@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Honours
Structural Biology of Infection Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Current work revolves around understanding how CDC toxins penetrate membranes. Professor Michael Parker mwp@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Honours
Structural Neurobiology Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Professor Michael Parker mwp@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Honours
Tackling drug resistance Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Examining how genetic variation associated with resistance to therapeutic treatments manifests at the molecular level and how it affects organism fitness is vital to the development of new therapeutics. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
The amyloidogenic protease inhibitor Cystatin C in health and disease Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Identification of these cells, and characterisation of the mechanisms that control the synthesis and dimerisation of Cst C will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of diseases associated with Cst C. 2 Prof. Jose Villadangos j.villadangos@unimelb.edu.au Dr. Justine Mintern n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
The role of mitochondria in Coxiella burnetii infection Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology . We are interested to characterise how these effector proteins are delivered to the mitochondrion and study how they interact with mitochondrial proteins to allow C. burnetii to replicate within a eukaryotic cell. Dr Diana Stojanovski d.stojanovski@unimelb.edu.au Dr Hayley Newton n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Treating the person not the disease Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Our projects combine both computational (bioinformatics) and experimental (protein expression, biophysics, structural biology) approaches to unravel the molecular mechanisms driving these mutations and derive novel predictive methods. Dr David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Understanding how Anthrax toxins function Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of Anthrax, secretes three soluble proteins collectively known as “Anthrax Toxin”: the pore-forming “Protective Antigen” (PA); and two enzymes the Lethal Factor (LF) and the Edema Factor (EF). Associate Professor Isabelle Rouiller isabelle.rouiller@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research
Understanding how membrane-less organelles form with optogenetic tools Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The project will involve designing and cloning new constructs, testing their expression in mammalian cells and designing mutations into them. A/Prof Danny Hatters dhatters@unimelb.edu.au Dr Dezerae Cox n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours
Understanding how the ATPase p97 functions at molecular level Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology The AAA ATPase p97 is a ubiquitous, abundant and essential protein. 2 Associate Professor Isabelle Rouiller isabelle.rouiller@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Understanding immune dysfunction in acute myeloid leukemia Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology In this project, we will examine molecular mechanisms that regulate flt3 receptor in healthy settings and in a model of AML. Dr Justine Mintern jmintern@unimelb.edu.au Professor Jose Villadangos n/a PhD; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Understanding the assembly of mitochondrial machines Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology This project features classical molecular techniques such as mammalian cell culture, Blue-Native (BN) PAGE, western blotting, affinity enrichment techniques such as co-immunoprecipitation and BioID, cellular imaging, computational and structural biology, and metabolic measurements such as oxygen consumption and ATP production. 2 Dr David Stroud david.stroud@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Understanding the Molecular Consequences of Mutations Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology We are continuously looking to expand and further develop our computational mutational analysis platform. Dr David Ascher David Ascher david.ascher@unimelb.edu.au n/a PhD; Masters by Research; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science
Using the immune system to kill tumours Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute Biochemistry and Molecular Biology We will examine expression of checkpoint proteins using a model of adoptive T cell immunotherapy for B cell lymphoma. In addition, we will undertake CRISPR/Cas9 genetic deletion to identify new molecules that are involved in the expression of PD1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 at the surface of immune cells and tumours. Dr Justine Mintern jmintern@unimelb.edu.au Professor Jose Villadangos n/a PhD; Honours; Master of Biomedical Science