Understanding the role of the circadian molecular clock in the development of dilated cardiac myopathy and atrial fibrillation.

Research Opportunity
PhD students, Masters by Research, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science, Post Doctor Researchers
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Number of Master Places Available
1
Department / Centre
Baker Department of Cardiometabolic Health
Location
Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Associate Professor Morag Young morag.young@baker.edu.au 385321111 Personal web page
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Professor Julie McMullen julie.mcmullen@baker.edu.au 385321111 Personal web page

Summary Virtually all cardiac functions, including the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) follow a circadian rhythm. Loss of appropriate timing keeping can lead to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD). Cardiac events often follow a circadian pattern, i.e. a heart attack or arrhythmia is more likely to occur in the morning. Atrial fibrillation (AF) or ‘arrhythmia’ in which your heart beats irregularly, reducing the heart’s ability to pump blood properly and increases the chance of a blood clots forming. This project will investigate whether the circadian molecular clock that underlies the circadian function of the heart, is dysregulated in a variety of cardiac disease models with and without AF. Models to be assessed include a transgenic mouse model with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) due to overexpression of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1), a model with DCM and AF due to overexpression of Mst1 together with reduced protective signalling due to reduced PI3K (Mst1-dnPI3K), and another transgenic model with DCM and AF due to overexpression of MURC (muscle-restricted coiled-coil; activates the RhoA/ROCK pathway). Techniques: RNA isolation, RT and PCR, Immunostaining, Histology, western block, immunostaining/histology, cell culture.

Project Details


School Research Themes

Cardiometabolic



Research Opportunities

PhD students, Masters by Research, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science, Post Doctor Researchers
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department / Centre

Baker Department of Cardiometabolic Health

Research Node

Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute

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