The role of Critical Signalling Pathways in Glioblastoma Mediated Immunosuppression

Research Opportunity
PhD students, Masters by Research, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
2
Number of Master Places Available
1
Department / Centre
Medicine
Location
Royal Melbourne Hospital
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Adrian Achuthan aaa@unimelb.edu.au 8344 3298 Personal web page
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Rodney Luwor rluwor@unimelb.edu.au Personal web page

Summary The most severe form of brain cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme is extremely lethal, with the average survival time of less than 12 months after diagnosis. Glioblastoma cells are generally highly proliferative, invasive. Recent evidence suggests that their micro-environment contains factors that suppress anti-tumour immune responses. However, the role of glioblastoma cell signalling in promoting an immunosuppressive environment is not well known. This project will evaluate the role of critical glioblastoma-promoting signalling pathways in promoting immunosuppression. Specifically, we will identify key immunosuppressive factors/cytokines secreted by glioblastoma cells and evaluate their role in blocking immune cell function (activation and killing activity).

Project Details

Project description: The most severe form of brain cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme is extremely lethal, with the average survival time of less than 12 months after diagnosis. Glioblastoma cells are generally highly proliferative, invasive. Recent evidence suggests that their micro-environment contains factors that suppress anti-tumour immune responses. However, the role of glioblastoma cell signalling in promoting an immunosuppressive environment is not well known. This project will evaluate the role of critical glioblastoma-promoting signalling pathways in promoting immunosuppression. Specifically, we will identify key immunosuppressive factors/cytokines secreted by glioblastoma cells and evaluate their role in blocking immune cell function (activation and killing activity).

Techniques: You will acquire a wide-range of skills in molecular and cellular biology (primary human monocyte/macrophage culture, qPCR, ELISA, western blotting, luciferase assays, microscopy).



Faculty Research Themes

Cancer, Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes

Cancer in Medicine



Research Opportunities

PhD students, Masters by Research, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department / Centre

Medicine

Research Node

Royal Melbourne Hospital

MDHS Research library
Explore by researcher, school, project or topic.