The impact of air pollution and other environmental factors on food allergy and other allergic diseases across the first 10 years of life: a population-based, longitudinal study.

Research Opportunity
PhD students
Department / Centre
Paediatrics
Location
Royal Children’s Hospital/Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
A/Prof Rachel Peters rachel.peters@mcri.edu.au
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Suzanne Mavoa Suzanne.Mavoa@epa.vic.gov.au

Summary A PhD project is available for a student to examine the association between air pollution and the risk of food allergy, eczema, asthma, and hay fever across childhood. This project would suit a student with an interest in epidemiology, the environment, climate change, pediatrics, and population health.

Project Details

Allergic diseases have increased in prevalence, with a rise in eczema and asthma observed in the 1960-1990s followed by a second wave of the allergy epidemic marked by an increase in food allergy in the last 1-2 decades. Australia has the highest reported prevalence of food allergy internationally, with 1 in 10 infants having a food allergy. Environmental factors play an important role in the development of allergic diseases. Exposure of epithelial cells to air pollution may trigger immunological pathways that skew the immune system to the allergic phenotype. However, whether this plays a role in the development of food allergy is unknown because there are few studies with robust food allergy measures linked to environmental data.

The HealthNuts, longitudinal, population-based cohort consists of 5300 children recruited at 12 months of age with gold-standard measures of food allergy. The cohort has been followed-up at 6 and 10 years of age, and children participated in a comprehensive health assessment which included objective measures of common allergic diseases (food allergy, eczema, asthma, and hay fever). The cohort has been enriched with environmental data including annual measures of air pollution and environmental greenness, from pregnancy through to 10 years of age.

A PhD project is available for a student to examine the association between air pollution and the risk of food allergy, eczema, asthma, and hay fever across childhood. This project would suit a student with an interest in epidemiology, the environment, climate change, pediatrics, and population health.



Faculty Research Themes

Child Health

School Research Themes

Child Health in Medicine



Research Opportunities

PhD students
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department / Centre

Paediatrics

Research Node

Royal Children’s Hospital/Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

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