The economic impact of total arterial grafting in coronary arterial bypass graft surgery compared to arterial and venous grafting

Research Opportunity
PhD, Masters by Research, Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
2
Department
Surgery
Location
Royal Melbourne Hospital
Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Andrew Palmer andrew.palmer@utas.edu.au 0458991553 Personal web page
David Canty dcanty@unimelb.edu.au 0429058878 Personal web page

Project Details

Heart bypass surgery (coronary revascularisation) is one of the commonest surgical operations performed worldwide and hence consumes a large portion of the health care budget. The current standard surgical treatment uses a mixture of arteries and veins for the bypass grafts. However, it is known that the arteries last longer than the veins, as the veins become blocked over time. Our team has recently performed a study (recently accepted for publication in Journal of the American College of Cardiology - impact factor 20) that showed that using only arteries instead of arteries and veins for heart bypass surgery was associated with prolonged survival and better quality of life in survivors which persisted to > 15 years after surgery. This was a long-term follow up study on a study that was published in 1999, which represented the first report of total arterial grafting using the internal mammary Y-graft.

We wish to determine the reduction in health care costs and improvement in quality of life using this new technique. A cost-benefit analysis will be performed using this data to determine whether the new technique is more cost effective. Ethics is already approved for the study to begin.

Involvement in this study would data collection, analysis and manuscript preparation aiming for a high impact journal such as JACC (above). Additional techniques learned would be health economic analysis including use of sophisticated decision-tree software (TreeAge). These skills would be very useful for future research.

There are other similar research projects which are available such as the economic impact on outcome of focused cardiac ultrasound before hip fracture surgery, the economic impact of recovery after cardiac surgery in patients receiving steroids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled sub-study. These could be done instead or grouped together to form a great PhD.


School Research Themes

Cardiometabolic



Research Opportunities

PhD, Masters by Research, Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Surgery

Research Node

Royal Melbourne Hospital

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