Synergistic and antagonistic interplay between Streptococcus pneumoniae and respiratory viruses

Research Opportunity
Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Number of Master Places Available
1
Department
Paediatrics
Location
Royal Children’s Hospital/Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Associate Professor Catherine Satzke catherine.satzke@mcri.edu.au Personal web page
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Doctor Sam Manna sam.manna@mcri.edu.au

Summary In this project, you will elucidate the underlying microbiological and/or immunological mechanisms that govern the synergistic and antagonistic aspects of the interplay between pneumococci and respiratory viruses. Key approaches to this project include: working with in vivo models as well as microbiological and immunological analysis of tissues from the respiratory tract.

Project Details

The contribution of bacterial-viral co-infections to the onset and severity of disease is increasingly attracting interest from researchers globally. Specifically, it is well established that co-infections of Streptococcus pneumoniae with respiratory viruses (e.g. Influenza or Respiratory Syncytial Virus) impact the severity of acute respiratory infections. This is because viral replication creates a more hospitable environment for pathogenic bacteria of the respiratory tract to flourish, predisposing individuals to a bacterial superinfection. However, recent research has found that the interplay between pneumococci and viruses is more complex than previously anticipated. We and others have shown that some aspects of co-infection are synergistic (resulting in greater disease severity), while others are antagonistic, where the presence of one pathogen negatively impacts the other. In this project, you will elucidate the underlying microbiological and/or immunological mechanisms that govern the synergistic and antagonistic aspects of the interplay between pneumococci and respiratory viruses. Key approaches to this project include: working with in vivo models as well as microbiological and immunological analysis of tissues from the respiratory tract. Your work will help us understand the complexities of pneumococcal-viral co-infection, including their implications for the effectiveness of vaccines targeting these pathogens.



Faculty Research Themes

Child Health

School Research Themes

Child Health in Medicine



Research Opportunities

Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Paediatrics

Research Node

Royal Children’s Hospital/Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

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