Streptococcal transmission and disease

Research Opportunity
Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Number of Master Places Available
1
Department
Paediatrics
Location
Royal Children’s Hospital/Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Associate Professor Catherine Satzke catherine.satzke@mcri.edu.au 03 8341 6438 Personal web page
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Doctor Jonathan Jacobson jonathan.jacobson@mcri.edu.au 03 9936 6531
Professor Andrew Steer Andrew.Steer@rch.org.au 03 8341 6446

Summary In this project, you will use a murine model of S. pyogenes colonisation to examine the effect of viruses on S. pyogenes colonisation, including for transmission (spread to co-housed littermates) and disease, and the mechanisms involved.Your project will provide important novel data on key components of S. pyogenes pathogenesis, and inform a pathway towards improving strategies for preventing S. pyogenes infections.

Project Details

The bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, "Strep A") causes a range of mild to severe infections, ranging from sore throat to streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.  Importantly, S. pyogenes infections can lead to serious sequelae such as rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. S. pyogenes can also colonise a variety of human tissues including the upper respiratory tract and skin in healthy people.   In a related bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have shown that viral co-infection can enhance bacterial virulence by increasing bacterial density and inflammation in the host, and by driving changes in expression of bacterial virulence genes. There is recent clinical epidemiologic evidence that viruses are also important in S. pyogenes pathogenesis, but little is known about this process.    In this project, you will use a murine model of S. pyogenes colonisation to examine the effect of viruses on S. pyogenes colonisation, including for transmission (spread to co-housed littermates) and disease, and the mechanisms involved. To achieve these aims, a range of methods will be employed including animal and tissue handling, immunological assays, traditional microbiology and molecular approaches such as qPCR, and gene expression analyses. Your project will provide important novel data on key components of S. pyogenes pathogenesis, and inform a pathway towards improving strategies for preventing S. pyogenes infections.



Faculty Research Themes

Child Health

School Research Themes

Child Health in Medicine



Research Opportunities

Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Paediatrics

Research Node

Royal Children’s Hospital/Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

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