Infertility in women and embryo implantation failure: identifying mechanistic insights using new genetic human technologies

Research Opportunity
PhD students, Masters by Research, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
2
Number of Master Places Available
2
Department / Centre
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Location
Royal Women’s Hospital
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Prof Eva Dimitriadis eva.dimitriadis@unimelb.edu.au 03 83452215 Personal web page
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Wei Zhou wei.zhou1@unimelb.edu.au Personal web page
Dr Ellen Menkhorst ellen.menkhorst@unimelb.edu.au

Summary Embryo implantation failure is a significant bottleneck for IVF treatment and a major reason for infertility in women. Currently there are no treatments for implantation failure. Embryo implantation requires an adequately endometrium to allow embryos to firmly adhere to initiate and establish pregnancy. There is no non-invasive method established to diagnose a receptive endometrium before embryo transfer. Human endometrial organoids have recently been established and pilot studies demonstrate that organoids recapitulate the histological phenotype of the tissue they are isolated from (for instance endometrial cancer). We have established a 3D human endometrial organoid culture system and will use these to investigate why women may be infertile. Identification of the mechanisms why women are infertile which is the first step to developing treatments for implantation failure and resultant infertility.

Project Details

Embryo implantation failure is a significant bottleneck for IVF treatment and a major reason for infertility in women. Currently there are no treatments for implantation failure. Embryo implantation requires an adequately endometrium to allow embryos to firmly adhere to initiate and establish pregnancy. There is no non-invasive method established to diagnose a receptive endometrium before embryo transfer. Human endometrial organoids have recently been established and pilot studies demonstrate that organoids recapitulate the histological phenotype of the tissue they are isolated from (for instance endometrial cancer). We have established a 3D human endometrial organoid culture system and will use these to investigate why women may be infertile. Identification of the mechanisms why women are infertile which is the first step to developing treatments for implantation failure and resultant infertility.



Faculty Research Themes

School Research Themes

Child Health in Medicine



Research Opportunities

PhD students, Masters by Research, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department / Centre

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Research Node

Royal Women’s Hospital

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