Identification of novel therapeutic targets in mucinous ovarian cancer

Research Opportunity
PhD, Masters by Research, Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Number of Master Places Available
1
Department
Medicine and Radiology
Location
St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Jessica Holien jholien@svi.edu.au
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Kylie Gorringe kylie.gorringe@petermac.org

Summary Mucinous ovarian cancer (MOC) is a subtype of ovarian cancer that is almost always fatal when diagnosed at a late stage or when it comes back after therapy. Therefore, it is essential that we find new approaches to treating MOC. Traditionally, the pharmaceutical industry has concentrated on identifying and targeting a ‘single protein switch that works’ i.e. by stopping a rogue cancer cell from dividing. But cancer cells rely on specific protein networks (multiple proteins interacting with each other). This project will use these networks to our advantage, and identify key protein:protein interactions which can be targeted by a combination of drugs, or drugs that bind to more than one target.

Project Details

Mucinous ovarian cancer (MOC) is a subtype of ovarian cancer that is almost always fatal when diagnosed at a late stage or when it comes back after therapy. Therefore, it is essential that we find new approaches to treating MOC. Traditionally, the pharmaceutical industry has concentrated on identifying and targeting a ‘single protein switch that works’ i.e. by stopping a rogue cancer cell from dividing. But cancer cells rely on specific protein networks (multiple proteins interacting with each other). This project will use these networks to our advantage, and identify key protein:protein interactions which can be targeted by a combination of drugs, or drugs that bind to more than one target. By using our unique bioinformatic pipeline, this project will create these protein networks and find specific druggable protein targets that are more prominent in MOC. Once we have established the most affected interactions, this project will use computers to search our virtual library of millions of drugs for ones that specifically target these interactions. These drugs will then be tested in the laboratory to assess whether the drug kills MOC cancer cells but not normal cells.



Faculty Research Themes

Cancer

School Research Themes

Cancer in Medicine



Research Opportunities

PhD, Masters by Research, Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Medicine and Radiology

Research Node

St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research

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