Characterisation of a novel early thymic progenitor

Research Opportunity
Honours students
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Department / Centre
Medicine and Radiology
Location
St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
A/Prof Mark Chong mchong@svi.edu.au

Summary T cells develop in the thymus. The earliest progenitors that seed the thymus from the bone marrow are multipotent cells that maintain the potential to differentiate into other immune cells types. Only once the appropriates signals are provided by the thymus do these cells commit to the T cell lineage. While plenty of evidence supports this paradigm, the identity of these early thymic progenitors remains poorly defined. The goal of this project is to characterise a novel early thymic progenitor populations that was recently identified by the lab.

Project Details

T cells develop in the thymus. The earliest progenitors that seed the thymus from the bone marrow are multipotent cells that maintain the potential to differentiate into other immune cells types. Only once the appropriates signals are provided by the thymus do these cells commit to the T cell lineage. While plenty of evidence supports this paradigm, the identity of these early thymic progenitors remains poorly defined. The goal of this project is to characterise a novel early thymic progenitor populations that was recently identified by the lab.



Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes



Research Opportunities

Honours students
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department / Centre

Medicine and Radiology

Research Node

St Vincent's Institute of Medical Research

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