A parallel group, blinded, placebo controlled, ranDomised pRagmatic clinical trial investigating the Effect of temazepAM on objective and subjective measures of sleep in critically ill patients (The DREAM trial)

Research Opportunity
Masters by Research, Honours students
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Number of Master Places Available
1
Department / Centre
Medicine and Radiology
Location
Royal Melbourne Hospital
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
A/Prof Adam Deane adam.deane@mh.org.au 0393429254 Personal web page
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Yasmine Ali Abdelhamid Yasmine.Aliabdelhamid@mh.org.au 0393429254

Summary Sleep dysfunction (a reduction in quantity and quality) occurs frequently in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is associated with adverse outcomes. To improve sleep in the ICU patients are often prescribed a sleep aid medication, however, there is no evidence that these drugs actually work in the ICU setting. This randomised clinical trial will answer the question: Does temazepam (a frequently administered drug) affect sleep quality or total sleep time in critically ill patients?

Project Details

Background

Sleep dysfunction (a reduction in quantity and quality) occurs frequently in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is associated with adverse outcomes. To improve sleep in the ICU patients are often prescribed a sleep aid medication, and at the Royal Melbourne Hospital temazepam is the most frequently prescribed drug. These drugs are administered on the basis that they improve patient sleep quality and quantity, however there is no evidence that temazepam actually works in the ICU setting. Moreover, these drugs may have adverse effects.

The proposed study will provide novel data as it will be the first comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of temazepam on sleep quality and quantity, in patients admitted to ICU compared to placebo.

Design

The DREAM trial is a prospective, parallel group, blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised, pragmatic clinical trial of 56 critically ill patients.

Hypothesis

The primary null hypothesis is that a single dose of temazepam has no effect on total sleep time in critically ill patients as quantified by bedside nurse (subjective) assessment.

Who would be suited to this project?

As this is a clinical study it is best suited to a higher degree student who desires to study post-graduate medicine

Is completion of this project feasible? 

The trial has HREC and governance approval and will commence enrolling patients in Oct 2020 to allow for completion during 2021


School Research Themes

Integrated Critical Care in Medicine



Research Opportunities

Masters by Research, Honours students
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department / Centre

Medicine and Radiology

Research Node

Royal Melbourne Hospital

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