Modulating skeletal muscle signal transduction to treat pre-diabetes

Research Opportunity
PhD students, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Number of Master Places Available
1
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Benjamin Parker ben.parker@unimelb.edu.au

Summary The Metabolic Proteomics and Signal Transduction Group is focused on understanding how signal transduction regulates metabolism with the goal of identifying new therapeutic targets to treat metabolic diseases. We primarily focus on metabolic tissues such as brain, liver, adipose, and muscle

Project Details

The Metabolic Proteomics and Signal Transduction Group is focused on understanding how signal transduction regulates metabolism with the goal of identifying new therapeutic targets to treat metabolic diseases. We primarily focus on metabolic tissues such as brain, liver, adipose, and muscle. Our research integrates physiology with systems biology techniques such as proteomics to understand how metabolic tissues develop, how they are regenerated, how they are affected by physical activity, how defects and genetic variants contribute to insulin resistance, and the identification and development of novel therapeutics. 

 

Insulin resistance (or pre-diabetes) is the fastest growing disease in the world and it's estimated >2 million Australians are at risk of developing type-2 diabetes. We urgently need new therapeutic treatments to use in conjunction with diet/exercise to treat these diseases. Insulin resistance is characterised by a major defect in the ability of insulin to promote glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. This results in hyperglycemia and several other diabetic complications. We have identified a series of lead candidates that promote insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.  These lead candidates include several kinases and phosphatases that regulate phosphorylation-based signaling pathways. This project will perform ex vivo functional screening in a series of pre-clinical models to understand how signaling pathways regulate glucose uptake and metabolism. The project will involve a variety of techniques including isotopic tracing of metabolism, phosphoproteomics and biochemistry.  




Research Opportunities

PhD students, Honours students, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.


MDHS Research library
Explore by researcher, school, project or topic.