How early life experience influences brain myelination and function late in life?

Research Opportunity
PhD, Masters by Research, Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Department
Anatomy and Neuroscience
Location
Medical Building
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Junhua Xiao xiaoj@unimelb.edu.au +61 3 9035 9759 Personal web page

Summary This project will involve the analysis as to whether and how altering brain activity influences the oligodendroglial cell dynamics and myelin integrity in the adolescent, adult or aging brains, in particular how early life experience influences brain myelination and function late in life.

Project Details

Myelination is mostly a postnatal process that peaks during development, continues into early adulthood and is subject to ongoing remodelling. The ongoing process of myelination exerts critically important influences on the structural and functional dynamics of the adult brain. Adults who actively learn complex tasks such as studying a second language, juggling or piano-playing, show increased myelination in specific regions of the brain. These observations indicate that brain activity impacts the production of new “adult” oligodendrocytes and new myelin formation even in adulthood.

Figure 1: We found oligodendrocytes are continuously generated in the adult central nervous system. (Arrows indicate newly generated oligodendroglial cells in a 4-month-old mouse brain) (Photo credit: Madeline Nicholson)



Faculty Research Themes

Neuroscience

School Research Themes

Biomedical Neuroscience, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Therapeutics & Translation



Research Opportunities

PhD, Masters by Research, Honours, Master of Biomedical Science
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Anatomy and Neuroscience

Research Group / Unit / Centre

Murray & Xiao laboratory: Neurotrophin and myelin

Research Node

Medical Building

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