How does oxytocin change social behaviour in a mouse model of autism spectrum disorder?

Research Opportunity
Honours students
Number of Honour Places Available
1
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Emma Burrows emma.burrows@florey.edu.au
Co-supervisor Email Number Webpage
Prof Anthony Hannan

Summary Among all people with ASD, 70% report having a profound or severe core activity limitation, needing help or supervision to navigate communication, self-care and mobility.

Project Details

Among all people with ASD, 70% report having a profound or severe core activity limitation, needing help or supervision to navigate communication, self-care and mobility. There are no treatments for ASD. While applied behavioural therapy has a moderate effect on reducing the symptoms of ASD, it is time consuming, costly and not easily accessed by all. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been explored as a treatment for ASD due to its role in social bonding, however to date, significant limitations in how these compounds cross the blood brain barrier have led to lack of efficacy. Our collaborators have designed novel oxytocin compounds and this project aims to test their efficacy in improving social behaviour in a genetic mouse model of Autism Spectrum disorder. This project will suit someone who is excited about handling mice and has a high attention to detail.



Research Opportunities

Honours students
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.


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