CCVs: Clathrin-coated vesicles and Coxiella containing vacuoles

Research Opportunity
PhD, Honours
Department
Microbiology and Immunology
Location
Doherty Institute
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Hayley Newton hnewton@unimelb.edu.au (03) 9035 6307 Personal web page

Summary This project will address whether this process also involves clathrin light chain and other key components of classical clathrin-mediated trafficking.

Project Details

Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, creates a unique replicative niche by modifying the human lysosome. One key feature of this vacuole is the recruitment of clathrin heavy chain to the vacuole membrane. Recruitment of this protein is important for intracellular success of Coxiella and vacuole expansion, through facilitation of autophagosome-vacuole fusion. We have identified several bacterial virulence factors that are involved in commandeering clathrin machinery. This project will address whether this process also involves clathrin light chain and other key components of classical clathrin-mediated trafficking. Key methodologies will include microscopy, tissue culture and protein biochemistry.



Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes

Infection & Immunity



Research Opportunities

PhD, Honours
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Microbiology and Immunology

Research Group / Unit / Centre

Newton laboratory: Virulence strategies of intracellular bacterial pathogens

Research Node

Doherty Institute

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