Blocking the development of secondary bacterial pneumonia

Research Opportunity
PhD, Masters by Research, Honours
Department
Microbiology and Immunology
Location
Doherty Institute
Primary Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Dr Linda Wakim linda.wakim@unimelb.edu.au (03) 9035 4141 Personal web page

Summary We are looking for highly motivated students to determine why influenza infection causes Staphylococcus aureus to transition from the upper to the lower respiratory tract resulting in the development of bacterial pneumonia.

Project Details

A complication associated with influenza virus infection is the development of a secondary bacterial pneumonia. Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent perpetrator of secondary bacterial pneumonia following influenza A virus (IAV) infection. These bacteria are a commensal organism found in the nasal passage of 20 per cent of humans, and persistent nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a significant risk factor for secondary staphylococcal pneumonia in IAV infected patients. We are looking for highly motivated students to determine why influenza infection causes Staphylococcus aureus to transition from the upper to the lower respiratory tract resulting in the development of bacterial pneumonia.



Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes

Infection & Immunity



Research Opportunities

PhD, Masters by Research, Honours
Students who are interested in joining this project will need to consider their elegibility as well as other requirements before contacting the supervisor of this research

Graduate Research application

Honours application

Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Microbiology and Immunology

Research Group / Unit / Centre

Wakim laboratory: Antiviral molecules, mucosal immunology, influenza virus, tissue resident memory T cells

Research Node

Doherty Institute

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