Appointment of Cato Chair and Head of the Department of Psychiatry

Appointment of Cato Chair and Head of the Department of Psychiatry

Professor Bernhard Baune (PhD, MD, MPH, FRANZCP) has been appointed as our new Cato Chair and Head of the Department of Psychiatry and will take up his position from 13 August 2018.

In his new role as Cato Chair and Head of the Department of Psychiatry, Bernhard will provide leadership and foster excellence in mental health teaching and research. Bernhard will also have an important role as a leader of academic psychiatry to promote clinical excellence in NorthWestern Mental Health (NWMH) – a hospital-based, community and specialist mental health service based in northern and western Melbourne. He will also take up a research and a clinical role within Melbourne Health, Royal Melbourne Hospital.

Bernhard currently holds the position of Chair of Psychiatry and Head of Discipline of Psychiatry at the University of Adelaide. Under his leadership, psychiatry research at the University of Adelaide gained international recognition for excellence in neuroimmunology and genomics of mental disorders, and for innovation in molecular and clinical underpinnings of personalised psychiatry. Research funds and research personnel in psychiatry tripled during his seven-year tenure in this role.  He leads an extensive research program into personalised psychiatry and he established the Psychiatric Prediction and Biomarker Centre and the Psychiatric Clinical Research Facility (CRF) at the University of Adelaide. Key research achievements include an in-depth understanding of the interaction between the immune and nervous system, the development of a systems biology approach and the establishment of innovative personalised clinical trials in major psychiatric disorders.

Bernhard’s research is committed to uncovering the underpinnings of severe mental illness and to enhancing treatment response to pharmacological and psychological interventions. His translational work aims to make real-world differences to the lives of people with mental illness by integrating neurobiological and clinical information, by personalising treatments and by targeting the mechanisms of functional recovery.