C-reactiv e protein (CRP) and C rohn’s disease– CRP as a potential phenotypic marker for disease

Research Opportunity
Honours
Project Status
Future
Department
Medicine and Radiology
Location
Royal Melbourne Hospital
Supervisor Email Number Webpage
Suresh Sivanesan
Finlay Macrae Personal web page

Project Details

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory condition which can affect any part of the gastro-intestinal tract to cause significant symptoms and morbidity. The condition can affect and segment of the gastrointestinal tract including the perianal region. It can develop into more complex disease resulting in abscesses, luminal strictures, fistulas and perforation. Clinicians have sought to classify Crohn’s disease in terms of the disease distribution or complications that it has caused.

The currently used classifications are helpful but they do not assist in reliably predicting appropriate treatment or outcomes. CRP is a serum inflammatory protein that is commonly elevated in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, infection and Crohn’s disease. It is produced by hepatocytes and is upregulated by cytokines IL-6, IL1β and TNFα. It has been described that not all patients with Crohn’s disease exhibit a rise in CRP. We hypothesize that if there are a subgroup of patients with active Crohn’s disease and a express a normal serum CRP. We intend to study our cohort of patients with active Crohn’s disease to determine their levels of CRP, disease phenotype and assess their response to treatment.

In particular if the hypothesis is true, we would hope to extend this work in the future to include cytokine and genotypic profiling of these patients. This work could open the door toward a better understanding of Crohn’s disease using widely available tools such as CRP. In future identifying subgroups of patients with Crohn’s disease based on cytokine and genetic profiling will enable a more tailored approach to patient care.

Research Opportunities

This research project is available to Honours students to join as part of their thesis.
Please contact the supervisor to discuss your options.

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Faculty Research Themes

Infection and Immunology

School Research Themes



Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact a supervisor.

Department

Medicine and Radiology

Research Node

Royal Melbourne Hospital